The Happier Hour: Philosophy To Help Life Suck Less

SAT // MAR 30 // 03:30PM

This month: DESIGN

“The privilege of a lifetime is to become who you truly are.” ― Carl Gustav Jung What is a brand? How does our identity affect how we live? This month we’ll explore authenticity via the intersection of philosophy and design.

The Happier Hour is a monthly event series bringing philosophy out of the ivory tower of academia and into our modern day agora: the bar. Each show features a philosophy professor and a philosophic-ish expert.  It’s like the self-help section– only way funnier, smarter, and with booze. And now it’s a podcast too! TheHappierHour.org/podcast #thehappierhour

Doors 3:30 PM, show 4:00 PM.
Tickets $15 in advance, $20 at the door.
21+
This event is mixed seated and standing room. Seats are first-come, first-served.
REFUND POLICY: Tickets maybe be refunded up to 24 hours before the event. Within 24 hours we may take exchanges for other events at our discretion. No refunds after the event.


HOST

Monica McCarthy is the creator and host of the live event and podcast, The Happier Hour: Philosophy To Help Life Suck Less. She is also the founder of  Cheshire Parlour, a communications consulting agency bringing meaningful dialogues to communities including The School of Life, Holstee, Impact Hub, 92Y, and Escape The City, where she has curated and facilitated hundreds of events focused on purpose and interdisciplinary connections. Monica is also an actress, and has performed on Broadway and in television and film, from from NYC to LA to Japan to the UK. Speaking of travel, Monica's passport is never far away. So far her travels have taken her to about 50 countries on 6 continents and counting. But she still has zero sense of direction. @MissMMcCarthy

GUESTS

Debbie Millman
Named “one of the most creative people in business” by Fast Company, and “one of the most influential designers working today” by Graphic Design USA, Debbie Millman is also an author, educator, curator and host of the podcast Design Matters, one of the world’s first and longest running podcasts. In the 13 years since its inception, the show has garnered over a five-million-downloads per year, a Cooper Hewitt National Design Award and iTunes has designated it one of the best overall podcasts.

Debbie is the author of six books, including: How to Think Like a Great Graphic Designer and Brand Thinking and Other Noble Pursuits. Both books have been published in over 10 languages. Debbie’s illustrations have appeared in publications such as The New York Times, New York Magazine, Print Magazine, Design Observer and Fast Company. She is the author of two books of illustrated essays: Look Both Ways and Self-Portrait As Your Traitor; the latter of which has been awarded a Gold Mobius, a Print Typography Award, and a medal from the Art Directors Club. Her artwork is included in the Boston Biennale, Chicago Design Museum, Anderson University, School of Visual Arts, Long Island University, The Wolfsonion Museum and the Czong Institute for Contemporary Art.

In 2009 Debbie co-founded with Steven Heller the world’s first graduate program in branding at the School of Visual Arts in New York City. Now in its eighth year, the program has achieved international acclaim. Debbie is also President Emeritus of AIGA, one of five women to hold the position in the organization’s 100-year history. She has been a juror for competitions including Cannes Lions, The Clio’s, the One Club and many, many more.

Kathleen Wallace
Kathleen Wallace is Professor of Philosophy at Hofstra University, USA. She has worked in American Philosophy, Metaphysics of Personal Identity, Hume, and Feminism. She has also published articles on anonymity and has a forthcoming work on Kant, Responsibility and Sustainability.

Her book, The Network Self: Relation, Process, and Personal Identity (Routledge), is due out this spring. The book aims to give an account of the personal identity of a relational, or "network" self, incorporating concepts from work in the American pragmatist and naturalist tradition. The concept of a relational self has been prominent in feminism, communitarianism, narrative self theories, and social network theories, but less prominent in philosophical treatments of personal identity. One aim of the book is to bridge traditions that are often disconnected from one another—feminism, personal identity theory, and pragmatism—to develop a unified theory of the self. Prof. Wallace is also co-editor of a special issue of the journal Metaphilosophy on "Philosophy as a Way of Life" scheduled for January 2020.

UPCOMING EVENTS


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